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Bee Home: A place for solitary bees to call their own {Bio-diversity}

Bee Home was developed as a free open-source design, for anyone, anywhere to contribute to supporting their local solitary pollinating inhabitants, and in turn assist in keeping our planets biodiversity in balance.

Set in motion by Space10 a research and design lab based in Copenhagen, in collaboration with interior and product designer Tanita Klein, and European tech design studio Bakken & Baeck. The concept of Bee Home aims to bring awareness to the importance these small insects have on our lives, as pollination from bees and other species plays an essential role in our food production and entire ecosystem.

Unlike the well-known western honeybee that lives in a hive and contributes to the production of the sweet, golden liquid we drizzle on our toast. Solitary bees [like their name suggests] most often live alone in small tree holes or ground burrows where they lay their eggs and store pollen.

Celebrated for their prolific pollinating abilities, as just one solitary bee can do the pollination performance of 120 worker honeybees.

Interestingly, of Australia’s 1,700 native bee species almost all are solitary bees.

Providing a refuge for bees is important, as over the years their population and natural environment filled with wildflowers and native plants has been impacted by expanding cities, degenerative agricultural practices, along with the increased use of chemical pesticides and insecticides.

Through Bee Home’s online platform, anyone is able to customise their very own home by modifying the height, base position and select from building a two to nine storey residence. With each additional level selected, the overall layout is digitally shuffled to create a unique model. Once you have confirmed your chosen design, a file is prepared for downloading which leads you to step three, fabricating your home through a local manufacturer with a CNC machine, these local spaces are known as a ‘Makerspace’. Already there is a large global community of Bee Hosts, Makerspaces and Bee Advocates which can be explored through an interactive world map.

Sustainability, localisation and accessibility were key drivers behind Bee Homes development, which was approached with comprehensive research and prototyping to ensure a design that met the needs of solitary bees. Sourcing local hardwoods responsibly from your region is encouraged, which your local makerspace can use along with your design file to bring your Bee Home to life.

Assembling the home is simple, due to its modular design that requires no tools or adhesives. Each storey placed above another around a single vertical piece of wood in the centre, known as the ‘spine and key’ system, meaning it is just as easy to disassemble for recycling.

Once your Bee Home has been constructed, place it outside where it can be exposed to the morning sunlight, not too far from flowers, or even plant some more nearby.

“This project takes advantage of the newest developments in digital fabrication and parametric design and introduces entirely new distribution methods to enable a fully democratic design process — where everyone, everywhere, is empowered to be part of designing, customising and fabricating their very own Bee Home locally.” – Space10

IMPACT

Bee Home was developed as a free open-source design, for anyone, anywhere to contribute to supporting their local solitary pollinating inhabitants, and in turn assist in keeping our planets biodiversity in balance.

Set in motion by Space10 a research and design lab based in Copenhagen, in collaboration with interior and product designer Tanita Klein, and European tech design studio Bakken & Baeck. The concept of Bee Home aims to bring awareness to the importance these small insects have on our lives, as pollination from bees and other species plays an essential role in our food production and entire ecosystem.

Unlike the well-known western honeybee that lives in a hive and contributes to the production of the sweet, golden liquid we drizzle on our toast. Solitary bees [like their name suggests] most often live alone in small tree holes or ground burrows where they lay their eggs and store pollen.

Celebrated for their prolific pollinating abilities, as just one solitary bee can do the pollination performance of 120 worker honeybees.

Interestingly, of Australia’s 1,700 native bee species almost all are solitary bees.

Providing a refuge for bees is important, as over the years their population and natural environment filled with wildflowers and native plants has been impacted by expanding cities, degenerative agricultural practices, along with the increased use of chemical pesticides and insecticides.

Through Bee Home’s online platform, anyone is able to customise their very own home by modifying the height, base position and select from building a two to nine storey residence. With each additional level selected, the overall layout is digitally shuffled to create a unique model. Once you have confirmed your chosen design, a file is prepared for downloading which leads you to step three, fabricating your home through a local manufacturer with a CNC machine, these local spaces are known as a ‘Makerspace’. Already there is a large global community of Bee Hosts, Makerspaces and Bee Advocates which can be explored through an interactive world map.

Sustainability, localisation and accessibility were key drivers behind Bee Homes development, which was approached with comprehensive research and prototyping to ensure a design that met the needs of solitary bees. Sourcing local hardwoods responsibly from your region is encouraged, which your local makerspace can use along with your design file to bring your Bee Home to life.

Assembling the home is simple, due to its modular design that requires no tools or adhesives. Each storey placed above another around a single vertical piece of wood in the centre, known as the ‘spine and key’ system, meaning it is just as easy to disassemble for recycling.

Once your Bee Home has been constructed, place it outside where it can be exposed to the morning sunlight, not too far from flowers, or even plant some more nearby.

“This project takes advantage of the newest developments in digital fabrication and parametric design and introduces entirely new distribution methods to enable a fully democratic design process — where everyone, everywhere, is empowered to be part of designing, customising and fabricating their very own Bee Home locally.” – Space10

SOLUTION

Bee Home was developed as a free open-source design, for anyone, anywhere to contribute to supporting their local solitary pollinating inhabitants, and in turn assist in keeping our planets biodiversity in balance.

Set in motion by Space10 a research and design lab based in Copenhagen, in collaboration with interior and product designer Tanita Klein, and European tech design studio Bakken & Baeck. The concept of Bee Home aims to bring awareness to the importance these small insects have on our lives, as pollination from bees and other species plays an essential role in our food production and entire ecosystem.

Unlike the well-known western honeybee that lives in a hive and contributes to the production of the sweet, golden liquid we drizzle on our toast. Solitary bees [like their name suggests] most often live alone in small tree holes or ground burrows where they lay their eggs and store pollen.

Celebrated for their prolific pollinating abilities, as just one solitary bee can do the pollination performance of 120 worker honeybees.

Interestingly, of Australia’s 1,700 native bee species almost all are solitary bees.

Providing a refuge for bees is important, as over the years their population and natural environment filled with wildflowers and native plants has been impacted by expanding cities, degenerative agricultural practices, along with the increased use of chemical pesticides and insecticides.

Through Bee Home’s online platform, anyone is able to customise their very own home by modifying the height, base position and select from building a two to nine storey residence. With each additional level selected, the overall layout is digitally shuffled to create a unique model. Once you have confirmed your chosen design, a file is prepared for downloading which leads you to step three, fabricating your home through a local manufacturer with a CNC machine, these local spaces are known as a ‘Makerspace’. Already there is a large global community of Bee Hosts, Makerspaces and Bee Advocates which can be explored through an interactive world map.

Sustainability, localisation and accessibility were key drivers behind Bee Homes development, which was approached with comprehensive research and prototyping to ensure a design that met the needs of solitary bees. Sourcing local hardwoods responsibly from your region is encouraged, which your local makerspace can use along with your design file to bring your Bee Home to life.

Assembling the home is simple, due to its modular design that requires no tools or adhesives. Each storey placed above another around a single vertical piece of wood in the centre, known as the ‘spine and key’ system, meaning it is just as easy to disassemble for recycling.

Once your Bee Home has been constructed, place it outside where it can be exposed to the morning sunlight, not too far from flowers, or even plant some more nearby.

“This project takes advantage of the newest developments in digital fabrication and parametric design and introduces entirely new distribution methods to enable a fully democratic design process — where everyone, everywhere, is empowered to be part of designing, customising and fabricating their very own Bee Home locally.” – Space10

ApplicationS & CHARACTERISTICS 

Bee Home was developed as a free open-source design, for anyone, anywhere to contribute to supporting their local solitary pollinating inhabitants, and in turn assist in keeping our planets biodiversity in balance.

Set in motion by Space10 a research and design lab based in Copenhagen, in collaboration with interior and product designer Tanita Klein, and European tech design studio Bakken & Baeck. The concept of Bee Home aims to bring awareness to the importance these small insects have on our lives, as pollination from bees and other species plays an essential role in our food production and entire ecosystem.

Unlike the well-known western honeybee that lives in a hive and contributes to the production of the sweet, golden liquid we drizzle on our toast. Solitary bees [like their name suggests] most often live alone in small tree holes or ground burrows where they lay their eggs and store pollen.

Celebrated for their prolific pollinating abilities, as just one solitary bee can do the pollination performance of 120 worker honeybees.

Interestingly, of Australia’s 1,700 native bee species almost all are solitary bees.

Providing a refuge for bees is important, as over the years their population and natural environment filled with wildflowers and native plants has been impacted by expanding cities, degenerative agricultural practices, along with the increased use of chemical pesticides and insecticides.

Through Bee Home’s online platform, anyone is able to customise their very own home by modifying the height, base position and select from building a two to nine storey residence. With each additional level selected, the overall layout is digitally shuffled to create a unique model. Once you have confirmed your chosen design, a file is prepared for downloading which leads you to step three, fabricating your home through a local manufacturer with a CNC machine, these local spaces are known as a ‘Makerspace’. Already there is a large global community of Bee Hosts, Makerspaces and Bee Advocates which can be explored through an interactive world map.

Sustainability, localisation and accessibility were key drivers behind Bee Homes development, which was approached with comprehensive research and prototyping to ensure a design that met the needs of solitary bees. Sourcing local hardwoods responsibly from your region is encouraged, which your local makerspace can use along with your design file to bring your Bee Home to life.

Assembling the home is simple, due to its modular design that requires no tools or adhesives. Each storey placed above another around a single vertical piece of wood in the centre, known as the ‘spine and key’ system, meaning it is just as easy to disassemble for recycling.

Once your Bee Home has been constructed, place it outside where it can be exposed to the morning sunlight, not too far from flowers, or even plant some more nearby.

“This project takes advantage of the newest developments in digital fabrication and parametric design and introduces entirely new distribution methods to enable a fully democratic design process — where everyone, everywhere, is empowered to be part of designing, customising and fabricating their very own Bee Home locally.” – Space10

RESOURCES • DOWNLOADS 

Bee Home was developed as a free open-source design, for anyone, anywhere to contribute to supporting their local solitary pollinating inhabitants, and in turn assist in keeping our planets biodiversity in balance.

Set in motion by Space10 a research and design lab based in Copenhagen, in collaboration with interior and product designer Tanita Klein, and European tech design studio Bakken & Baeck. The concept of Bee Home aims to bring awareness to the importance these small insects have on our lives, as pollination from bees and other species plays an essential role in our food production and entire ecosystem.

Unlike the well-known western honeybee that lives in a hive and contributes to the production of the sweet, golden liquid we drizzle on our toast. Solitary bees [like their name suggests] most often live alone in small tree holes or ground burrows where they lay their eggs and store pollen.

Celebrated for their prolific pollinating abilities, as just one solitary bee can do the pollination performance of 120 worker honeybees.

Interestingly, of Australia’s 1,700 native bee species almost all are solitary bees.

Providing a refuge for bees is important, as over the years their population and natural environment filled with wildflowers and native plants has been impacted by expanding cities, degenerative agricultural practices, along with the increased use of chemical pesticides and insecticides.

Through Bee Home’s online platform, anyone is able to customise their very own home by modifying the height, base position and select from building a two to nine storey residence. With each additional level selected, the overall layout is digitally shuffled to create a unique model. Once you have confirmed your chosen design, a file is prepared for downloading which leads you to step three, fabricating your home through a local manufacturer with a CNC machine, these local spaces are known as a ‘Makerspace’. Already there is a large global community of Bee Hosts, Makerspaces and Bee Advocates which can be explored through an interactive world map.

Sustainability, localisation and accessibility were key drivers behind Bee Homes development, which was approached with comprehensive research and prototyping to ensure a design that met the needs of solitary bees. Sourcing local hardwoods responsibly from your region is encouraged, which your local makerspace can use along with your design file to bring your Bee Home to life.

Assembling the home is simple, due to its modular design that requires no tools or adhesives. Each storey placed above another around a single vertical piece of wood in the centre, known as the ‘spine and key’ system, meaning it is just as easy to disassemble for recycling.

Once your Bee Home has been constructed, place it outside where it can be exposed to the morning sunlight, not too far from flowers, or even plant some more nearby.

“This project takes advantage of the newest developments in digital fabrication and parametric design and introduces entirely new distribution methods to enable a fully democratic design process — where everyone, everywhere, is empowered to be part of designing, customising and fabricating their very own Bee Home locally.” – Space10

Contact

Location

Denmark

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